Monday, June 9, 2014

The church of ST. ANDREW consists of a chancel (41½ ft. by 16 ft.), north chapel (23¾ ft. by 16 ft.), south chapel (21 ft. by 18¼ ft.), north vestry (14 ft. by 11½ ft.), nave (57 ft. by 23 ft.), north aisle (12¾ ft. wide), south aisle (14¼ ft. wide), west tower (13 ft. by 13 ft.), and south porch. The walls are of rubble and pebble rubble with stone dressings except the south wall of the chancel, which is of red bricks; and the roofs are covered with lead. The church is mentioned in the Domesday Survey, 1086, but the oldest existing portion is the north arcade of the nave, which dates from the middle of the 13th century and indicates a nave of the same


The church of ST. ANDREW consists of a chancel (41½ ft. by 16 ft.), north chapel (23¾ ft. by 16 ft.), south chapel (21 ft. by 18¼ ft.), north vestry (14 ft. by 11½ ft.), nave (57 ft. by 23 ft.), north aisle (12¾ ft. wide), south aisle (14¼ ft. wide), west tower (13 ft. by 13 ft.), and south porch. The walls are of rubble and pebble rubble with stone dressings except the south wall of the chancel, which is of red bricks; and the roofs are covered with lead.
The church is mentioned in the Domesday Survey, 1086, but the oldest existing portion is the north arcade of the nave, which dates from the middle of the 13th century and indicates a nave of the same size as the present. In the last quarter of the 13th century a south aisle and arcade were added. About 1300 the chancel and the chancel arch were rebuilt, and a few years later the north aisle was probably rebuilt, for the foundations of a 14th-century diagonal buttress were found when the north-west corner was underpinned in 1921. Quite early in the 14th century the tower was built, and the clearstory was added to the nave about 1370. At the end of the 15th century the south aisle was rebuilt and the porch and south chapel added; the north aisle was rebuilt and the north chapel added about 1500, the chancel being largely rebuilt at about the same time. The south wall of the chancel was rebuilt in the 18th century. In 1748 the roofs of the chancel, the two chapels and the nave were out of repair; (fn. 148) in 1787 a new beam was inserted in the nave roof, and another in 1841. (fn. 149) The vestry was built in 1847, and the chancel was re-roofed in 1853; (fn. 150) and about the same time the Montagu vault was formed in the north chapel, a small porch for access to it being added some forty years later. The whole church was restored in 1881–2; the spire in 1903, and the roofs of the nave, aisles and chapels in 1930–1.

Reproduced by permission of the Controller of H.M. Stationery Office from the Report of the Royal Commission on Historical Monuments, Hunts.
Reproduced by permission of the Controller of H.M. Stationery Office from the Report of the Royal Commission on Historical Monuments, Hunts.
The chancel, chiefly of the 15th century, has a modern four-light east window with vertical tracery in a four-centred head; previous to 1881 this window was a mean four-light window with a nearly flat head. (fn. 151) The north wall has a blocked three-light window of c. 1300, formerly with intersecting tracery in a twocentred head, but mullions and tracery have gone; an archway to the north chapel c. 1500, having a twocentred arch of two moulded orders, the lower order carried on semicircular attached shafts with moulded capitals; and a modern doorway to the vestry. The south wall, partly rebuilt in red brickwork in the 18th century, has a late 15th-century archway to the south chapel, having a two-centred arch of two chamfered orders, and an extra outer order on the south, the lower order carried on semicircular attached shafts with moulded capitals and bases, the latter much damaged; and a plain 18th-century doorway with a semicircular head and plain jambs. The chancel arch, c. 1300, has a two-centred arch of three moulded orders, the lower order resting on filleted shafts with moulded capitals.
Above the chancel roof, visible on the outside only, are two blocked openings, one with a square head and the other lozenge-shaped. The roof is modern.
The vestry, dated 1847, has a four-centred doorway under a square label, in the east wall; a two-light window with tracery in a two-centred head, in the north wall; and a fireplace in the south wall.
The north chapel, c. 1500, (fn. 152) has a four-light east window with vertical tracery in a four-centred head. The north wall has two similar three-light windows. There is no arch between the chapel and the aisle, but the chapel has been filled with a modern vault for the Montagu family, and its present floor is about three feet above the floor of the church. A shallow porch gives access to this vault, and has a doorway with a four-centred head and flanked by two buttresses surmounted by pinnacles supporting heraldic beasts; a shaped gable incloses a coat of arms (Montagu and Monthermer quarterly), and is finished with an heraldic finial.
The late 15th-century south chapel (fn. 153) has a fivelight east window with vertical tracery in a depressed four-centred head. The south wall has two similar two-light windows and a double piscina with fourcentred arches under a square head and having two circular basins. In the north-west angle are the rood-stairs, with a square-headed doorway. The contemporary door has cinquefoiled headed panels. There is no arch between the chapel and the aisle.