Saturday, April 19, 2014

There are also other monuments: in the chancel, to Consuelo, Duchess of Manchester [d. 1909]; and floor slabs to R[ebecca] Bingham, d. 180[o]; the Rev. David Lewis, d. 1819, and Mary, his widow, d. 1830; and Deborah Bunting, d. 1820. In the north chapel, to George Montagu, eldest son of Brig. Genl. Montagu and great-grandson of the 1st Earl of Manchester (n.d.). In the south chapel, to John Pusser, d. 1732; glass window to the 7th Duke of Manchester, d. 1890


At the entrance to the north chapel is a late 15thcentury oak screen of five and a half bays with cusped and sub-cusped ogee heads, crocketed and finialed, and with vertical tracery above. The posts have attached buttresses and pinnacles; the central mullion is omitted to form an entrance, and the top beam is finished with carved brattishing. The lower part is missing, and what remains has been somewhat restored and stands upon a modern wall.
At the entrance to the south chapel is a late 15thcentury oak screen of four bays and a central opening. The bays are generally similar to that on the north, but the mullions have no attached buttresses. The central opening has a cusped and sub-cusped twocentred arch with crocketed and finialed ogee label, and the upper part is filled in with similar tracery to the side bays. The cornice has flowered pateræ, but no brattishing. The close lower part of the screen has cusped and sub-cusped tracery, two panels to each bay, and four of them are painted with figures of the Virgin with St. Anne, St. Michael, St. Edmund and St. Edward the Confessor.
In the vestry is a 17th-century chest with carved front and top rail.
In the chancel are various pieces of funeral armour— two helms with crests, two coronets, a tabard, two swords, three gauntlets, two spurs, six standards and banners, and seven hatchments. In the south chapel are a helmet, two coronets, a tabard and one hatchment.
In the head of the south-west window of the south chapel are some remains of 15th-century painted glass, including the figure of a man in ermine robes, and below him the name 'Symon'; and there are some other fragments in the east window of this chapel, and in the east window of the north chapel.
About the middle of the last century some wall paintings were discovered, including representations of the seven deadly sins, but they were much decayed, so were covered up again. (fn. 160)
In the south chapel there is a monument to Henry, first Earl of Manchester, d. 1641, consisting of a black marble slab supported on white marble columns and arches, with coat of arms; against the wall behind is an elliptical inscription tablet surmounted by an achievement of arms, above which is a Corinthian column carrying a helm and crest; two other columns flank the monument and carry carved skulls. There is also a monument to Lady Isabella (Rich), wife of Sir John Smyth, d. 1632, having an inscription tablet between two Doric columns supporting an entablature and shields of arms; also a monument to Lady Anne (Rich), wife of the third Earl of Manchester, d. 1641, with an inscription tablet in a cartouche standing on a pedestal; and a similar monument to Lady Essex (Cheeke), another wife of the same Earl, d. 1658.
There are also other monuments: in the chancel, to Consuelo, Duchess of Manchester [d. 1909]; and floor slabs to R[ebecca] Bingham, d. 180[o]; the Rev. David Lewis, d. 1819, and Mary, his widow, d. 1830; and Deborah Bunting, d. 1820. In the north chapel, to George Montagu, eldest son of Brig. Genl. Montagu and great-grandson of the 1st Earl of Manchester (n.d.). In the south chapel, to John Pusser, d. 1732; glass window to the 7th Duke of Manchester, d. 1890; and floor slabs to Lady Essex (Rich), wife of Sir Tho. Cheeke, and her daughter Essex, wife of the 2nd Earl of Manchester, d. 1658. In the north aisle, to Thomas Day, d. 1818, and Sarah, his widow, d. 1843; Thomas Day, d. 1857; Mary (Ainsworth), wife of C. Paget Blake, d. 1860; John Chapman, d. 1868; Leslie L. M. Thonger, d. 1889, and Frederick C. F. Thonger, d. 1898; glass windows to Henry Carter, d. 1890, Mary Ann, his wife, d. 1895, Lieut. Henry Gordon Carter, d. 1915, and Firman Gordon Carter, d. 1916. In the south aisle, to William Ashton, d. 1722; the Rev. Harry Welstead, d. 1819; Mary Agnes Welstead, d. 1857; Benjamin Welstead, d. 1858, and Mary, his widow, d. 1873; George Richard Welstead, d. 1887; Sarah Hannah, wife of Major Hayes, d. 1894, and Major James Hayes, d. 1896; Lieut. Col. Harry Merrion Welstead, d. 1915; glass window to the Rev. Thomas Ainsworth, vicar, d. 1868; and Joseph Hughes Hemming, d. 1899.
The registers are as follows: (i) baptisms, marriages and burials 26 December 1653 to 5 June 1709, much out of order; (ii) the same 4 September 1709 to 7 June 1748, somewhat damaged and the dates much out of order—there are a few pages containing entries from 21 March 1646 to 20 Feb. 165¾; (fn. 161) (iii) the same—1748 to—1799, marriages end 17 June 1753, badly burnt at the top of all the pages; (iv) baptisms and burials 2 January 1800 to 3 March 1811, and a loose sheet to 31 March 1812; (v) the Official Marriage Book 19 April 1754 to 24 December 1798; (vi) the same 31 December 1798 to 9 November 1812.
The church plate (fn. 162) consists of a large late 16thcentury silver cup, partly gilt, with three shaped brackets on stem, engraved with scenes of Bel and the Dragon, Daniel in the lions' den, and Habakkuk carried through the air by an angel, and inscribed 'Daniel XIII,' no date-letter; a silver cup, inscribed 'The Gift of Henry Ashton to the Parrish of Kimbalton. 1665,' and with his arms, Argent, a mullet pierced Gules, and crest, A boar's head couped, hall-marked for 1665–6; a silver cup, apparently a copy of the last, inscribed 'The Gift of the Rev. Thos. Ainsworth, Vicar, to the Parish Church of Kimbolton, 1859,' hall-marked for 1859–60; a 17th-century silver standing paten, with no dateletter; a silver alms-dish with floral decoration in repoussé work, c. 1600, no date-letter; a silvergilt flagon, inscribed 'The Gift of Thos. Day Esqr.,' '45.16. 0,' hall-marked for 1750–1.